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Thread: Cue Ball Weight?

  1. #1

    Default Cue Ball Weight?

    Is there a regulation weight for a cue ball? I've been asked this question before and really don't know. Also, one of the pool rooms I used to play in, I could almost be certain that a few of the cue balls felt like they were different in weights..or it was my imagination.

  2. #2
    mechmat Guest

    Default

    A regulation cue ball is the same weight as the rest of the balls. I don't know what it is, but there is definitely a standard weight. I'd imagine a very cheap set of balls may have less stringent tolerances on the balls, so they may not be exactly the same as the other balls, but I don't know for sure if there's a noticable difference.

    If you play on a bar table, the cue ball is almost always heavier than the rest of the balls (there are some new-fangled tables that use lasers that have regular cue balls, but I've never actually seen one). The reason for that is that the table needs to be able to tell the difference between the cue ball and the rest of the balls so when you scratch it can send it back to the cue ball return and not into the tray with the rest of the balls. The only way to do this is to weight the cue ball or make it larger than the rest of the balls (which also makes it heavier).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    5.9 oz

  4. #4

    Default

    from the BCA:

    POOL BALL SPECIFICATIONS:


    Molded and finished in a perfect sphere in the following weight and diameter:
    Pocket Billiard Balls
    Weight: 5 1/2 to 6 oz. *Diameter: 2 1/4"
    *Diameter tolerance of (plus or minus) .005"
    http://www.bca-pool.com/play/tournam...es/equip.shtml
    " A BAD NIGHT OF POOL IS BETTER THEN A GOOD DAY AT WORK "
    http://www.ibilliard.co.il
    My Humble (but growing...) Pool Cues Collection

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Toledo, Ohio
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    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mechmat
    If you play on a bar table, the cue ball is almost always heavier than the rest of the balls (there are some new-fangled tables that use lasers that have regular cue balls, but I've never actually seen one). The reason for that is that the table needs to be able to tell the difference between the cue ball and the rest of the balls so when you scratch it can send it back to the cue ball return and not into the tray with the rest of the balls. The only way to do this is to weight the cue ball or make it larger than the rest of the balls (which also makes it heavier).
    Yep...this is true. It sucks!
    Erik -aka- ThePoolHustler

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks...didn't think to look at the BCA. I guess according to that the correct weight can be a 1/2 ounce variation. I guess this would have different affects on draw, follow etc...so as I remember...get to know your table your playing on, especially if you like to play 3, 6, 9.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Coldwater. MI
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    I posted a question on this last week. Most bars and pool halls with coin-op table use a cement or just cheap cue balls that is close to imposible to draw. The cue ball isn't heavier on a coin-op table it has a magnet in it so it can tell the difference. Aramith makes a green logo ball(5.8oz) that is designed for coin-op tables and plays great. http://www.seyberts.com/table_access...ls/singles.htm

  8. #8
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    Diamond tables are available with an optical sensor so you don't need oversized or magnetic cue balls.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    The regulation wieght for a set of pool balls is indeed 5.5 to 6 ounces. With a set of good balls, there is not such a variation between the balls in a set. High quality balls like Centennials or Super Aramith Pro balls will not vary by more than a few percent or less.

    For you physicists out there, the cue ball should weigh the same, or less, as the object balls. The red circle and super aramith pro cue balls are supposed to be a little lighter. This makes the cue ball more responsive and lively. The red circle and aramith super pro cue balls are made out of the same phenolic as their carom balls.

    The reason a heavy cue ball causes control problems is from the nature of elastic collisions. If the masses are equal, the result of a head-on collision will be complete energy transfer. That is why a skidding cue ball stops dead on a head-on hit.

    You can find a fascinating website on this at
    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/colsta.html
    The race may not got the swift nor the battle to the strong, but the smart money bets that way.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Thanks.. Now my brain hurts!! :twisted:

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